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Mangotsfield Secondary

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Year 11 Support and Revision

This is to help you organise your revision so that you are ready for your exams, both the PPEs in January and your final GCSEs in the summer. Below are top tips on how to revise and what else you can do to be fully prepared for your exams. There is also a subject by subject guide about what is important and what you need to revise. This includes advice on what revision guides to buy. Many of these can be purchased through school – please visit the finance tab to do this.


This webpage should be your one stop shop to preparing well. Each week you will find the updated link to what you should be revising – this is all mapped out in the calendar below. Information can also be found on Google Classroom. Your teachers will lead you through revision on a week by week basis and check that you are keeping on top of what you need to be doing – remember it’s keep up, not catch up!


If you are worried at any point or don’t know what to do please talk to your mentor or your subject teacher/s. We will help you.


It is important to start revising early. This means you can pace yourself which should reduce your stress levels and help the information stick in your head better. It allows you to have the time to revisit things you’ve learnt which helps you to remember them.


This booklet is set up to pace you through your revision allowing you to revisit each topic multiple times so that you can really absorb the information.


How it works

Step One
16th November – 7th March (with a gap in the middle for PPEs)
During this period you will revise everything once. Your teachers have split up revision into 12 sections. Each week you’ll be given a section to focus on (this will be communicated via Google Classroom and in your lessons). You need to produce revision materials (e.g. mind maps, flash cards, posters, notes, PowerPoints etc) on each topic. These should be stored ready to revisiting revision in step 2.
Step Two
8th March – 2nd May
During this period you will revisit each of the 12 sections – two each week. During this time you should try to apply the knowledge e.g. do practice questions, test yourself (or get someone else to test you) to check what you do and don’t know. You can then add to your revision materials made in step one with any other information you are missing
Step Three
3rd May – 23rd May
This is your third re-visit of each section. During this time you really need to be working to commit this to memory. For most subjects practice is the best way to do this – make sure you try the hard questions now as well! If you are getting incorrect answers the best way to learn is to correct them. Use your revision materials, revision guides and your exercise book to help with this.
Step Four
24th May – early July
This will be your exam period (mainly from 7th June). During this time you are likely to be focused on the exams coming up each week. If you have followed steps 1-3 then this should be consolidating what you already know. Keep practising questions and working to commit information to memory (read-write-cover-check).

 

 

 

Calendar for Year 11

Due to COVID-19 it was announced on 12th October that GCSE exams will be pushed back by 3 weeks, this is also likely to impact deadlines for coursework and vocational exams. The timeline below shows how the steps to revision will fit into this. As soon as we have the dates for the summer exams we will update you and your parents.

 

Week beginning

Revision Section Number / Revision Guidance

Exams / Other

09-Nov

Read the Steps to Success Handbook. Plan your time.

16-Nov

Section 1

23-Nov

Section 2

30-Nov

Section 3

07-Dec

Section 4

14-Dec

Section 5

21-Dec

Section 6

Christmas Holidays

28-Dec

Exam focused week

Christmas Holidays

04-Jan

Exam focused week

PPE Week 1

11-Jan

Exam focused week

PPE Week 2

18-Jan

Exam focused week

PPE Week 3

25-Jan

Section 7

01-Feb

Section 8

08-Feb

Section 9

PPE Results

15-Feb

Section 10

Half Term

22-Feb

Section 11

01-Mar

Section 12

08-Mar

Sections 1 & 7

15-Mar

Sections 2 & 8

22-Mar

Sections 3 & 9

29-Mar

Sections 4 & 10

05-Apr

Revision focused on PPE Feedback

Easter Holidays

12-Apr

Revision focused on PPE Feedback

Easter Holidays

19-Apr

Sections 5 & 11

26-Apr

Sections 6 & 12

03-May

Sections 1, 2, 7 & 8

10-May

Sections 3, 4, 9 & 10

17-May

Sections 5, 6, 11 & 12

24-May

Exam focused week

There is likely to be 1 English Language & 1 Maths exam this week

31-May

Exam focused week

Half Term

07-Jun

Exam focused week

GCSE exams start this week

14-Jun

Exam focused week

21-Jun

Exam focused week

28-Jun

Exam focused week

05-Jul

Exam focused week

GCSE exams are likely to finish in this week (TBC)

How to revise

How to break down your revision

You should revise each topic for an hour at a time. Each hour should be a power hour: 50 minutes of hard work followed by a 10 minute break away from your study space. For each subject you will notice each section of revision is split into two groups – essential and maximise. You should spend an hour on each, every week

  • Essential: this is the minimum revision you should cover. It covers all the basics. Start with this revision each week. Make sure you understand it first.
  • Maximise: this is the top up to cover everything you need. You need to revise this as well if you want a good grade.

Revising for your PPEs

 

Your teachers have designed the sections of revision so that 1-6 cover the main information you will need for the PPE in January. There is a week before the PPE and the time during the PPE to have time to revisit these first revision materials so you are ready for these exams. During this time you should be testing your knowledge (similar to step 2) to help commit it to memory.

The Process

Get organised

  • Find a quiet table or desk where you can put your stuff
  • Avoid distractions like your phone (put it in a different room to you) or social media
  • Set aside dedicated time each week for revision. There are details on how much time this needs to be and how to organise your time later in this booklet.

 

Make revision materials (particularly steps 1 & 2)

Reading through your notes will not allow you to absorb all the information you need. You need to be doing something with it. 

  • Make your own resources (see ideas below) using revision guides and your exercise books to help. For each subject your teachers have given you references to look at each week
  • This has been a focus during the second part of term 1. You have tried lots of revision methods (information on next few pages) so hopefully you know what works for you.n this booklet your teachers have given you key references to use for each topic
  • Make sure you keep all your revision materials in a safe place; you need to revisit them time and time again. 

 

Test your memory (particularly in steps 2-4)

Unfortunately just making the resources isn’t enough. You need to get the information to stick in your head. The best way to do this is practice – time and time again! When you’re practicing make yourself write down the answers  it’s easy to think you know it... you need to prove it to yourself!

    • READ-WRITE-COVER-CHECK using the resources you’ve made e.g. flash cards, posters, mind maps. Then Repeat!
    • Get someone to test you on your resources. 
    • Complete tests or past paper questions to check your understanding. Mark your answers, correct those that are wrong and learn from your mistakes! Revisit the references for things you haven't understood.

Active Revision Strategies

The key to good (and more interesting) revision is active learning. This means that you are doing something other than reading through your classwork / notes. By being active you are more likely to fully engage with the information moving it into your long-term memory. Through active learning you create resources you can use to revisit information in the run up to exams.

Everyone is different and so you need to decide which strategy/ strategies work for you. Some are more words based and some are more picture/visual based. To keep you interested in revision it’s a good idea to mix up which revision strategies you use rather than sticking to just one. 

You have been looking at some of these during lessons in term 1. The slides you used in your lessons are below. 

 

View document learning/revision_strategy_1.jpg

 

View document learning/revision_strategy_2.jpg

 

View document learning/revision_strategy_3.jpg

 

View document learning/revision_strategy_4.jpg

 

Some other ideas you could use are:

  • Revision Clocks
  • Annotating blank diagrams to check for understanding (e.g. human body for PE or Biology, Landforms for Geography etc)
  • Playing Pictionary or Articulate with the key terms

Revision Timetables

 

The information in this booklet does most the work for you. It tells you what you need to do each week. What you need to do is decide when in each week you are going to do it.

YOU WILL BE COMPLETING QUIZZES AND CHECKS ON THE CONTENT OF THE PREVIOUS WEEK’S REVISION IN LESSONS

Until Easter you should be spending a minimum of 2 hours a week per GCSE qualification so English needs 4 hours in total and Science needs 4 hours for Trilogy and 6 hours for Triple. 

Most students do 9 GCSES which means you’ll need to find around 18 hours each week. If your course doesn’t have a final exam you should spend this time on extended learning set by your teachers. Whilst 18 hours may sound a lot you, bear in mind you are awake for about 112 hours a week and this time is an investment in your future! 

To work out where the available time is in your week fill in the blank grid on page 11 using the guidance below:

  1. Block out time you are not available e.g. school, clubs, visiting relatives etc. for that week. Then block out any times when you know you don’t work well e.g. before 10am, after 10pm etc.
  2. Spread your revision throughout the week into power hour slots. This is 50 minutes of revision followed by a 10 minute break
  3. Put a minimum of two power hours per subject per subject during the week. 
  4. Make sure you mix up subjects you find easier / enjoy with subjects you find harder / enjoy less. 
  5. Put in 3 or 4 Catch Up Slots each week – these are times for exactly what it says – they will help to stop you falling behind. If you’ve stayed on top then they are bonus free time!

Below is an example of how your week might look - you may prefer to do more revision on weekends and less in the week it’s up to you. You can have a standard timetable for most weeks and then if something different is happening e.g. holidays then you can make a different version for that week. Your timetable does not need to be particularly neat – as long as you can read it! If you know you’ll find it hard to stick to get people to hold you to account –stick it to the fridge or somewhere else you and other people will regularly see it.

Example of a revision timetable

EXAMPLE

Mon

Tue

Wed

Thur

Fri

Sat

Sun

7am

SLEEP / BREAKFAST

8am

SCHOOL

Sleep

Sleep

9am

Football

10am

11am

Nan’s

12

Media

1pm

Lunch

2pm

English Lang

3pm

Geog

4pm

Chill Out time

Catch Up

Computing

5pm

English Lang

Media

Cadets

Maths

Drama

Chill out time

Science

6pm

Drama

French

Geog

French

Catch Up

7pm

DINNER TIME

8pm

Science

Maths

English Lit

Science

Social / Out

Social / Out

Catch Up

9pm

Computing

Catch Up

Science

English Lit

Catch Up

10pm

Bedtime

Bedtime



Mon

Tue

Wed

Thur

Fri

Sat

Sun

7am



8am



9am



10am



11am



12



1pm



2pm



3pm



4pm



5pm



6pm



7pm



8pm



9pm



10pm



 

Equipment

It’s important that you come to school prepared with everything you need to learn. You also need to have all the right equipment for exams so that you can do the very best you can – there can never be a guarantee that invigilators will have enough equipment to lend out. A list of what is required is on the next page. If you need any assistance in getting these materials please talk to your mentor.

As good revision also needs you to be active you need to make sure you have a range of materials available. 

For revision

For exams

  • Post-stick notes
  • A4 lined and plain paper
  • Flash cards and/or sheets of card
  • Bright coloured pens/pencils
  • Highlighters
  • Folders/plastic wallets/dividers to organise notes
  • Clear pencil case
  • Several black pens
  • Several pencils
  • Pencil sharpener
  • Rubber
  • Ruler
  • Highlighter (to annotate exam papers)
  • Scientific calculator
  • Other specialist equipment will be advised by teachers

 

Attendance, Sleep, Diet, Exercise

During Year 11 it is vital you attend school and make the most of every lesson. Your lifestyle is important as well. Here are some top tips on other factors that are keys to success.

Attendance

There is a proven link between attendance and attainment at GCSE. Whenever a student is absent from school they are missing learning and feedback from their teacher. Mangotsfield School has an attendance target of 97%. We expect all students, including Year 11, to be aiming for this target. Attendance below this is the equivalent of missing a week or more of the year.

We appreciate that there are odd days when you will not be well enough to come into school, however it is crucial you catch up on missed work. If you have to isolate due to Covid then you should continue to work at home. Your teachers’ will help you to keep up if you have to have time away from school.

Sleep

It is really important that you get enough sleep. This should be a minimum of 8 hours a night – every night! Some top tips to help you include: 

    • Stick to regular bedtimes 
    • Make sure you get regular exercise 
    • Allow time to relax and switch off before going to bed
    • If your mind is active don’t try to go straight to sleep – do something to switch off first e.g. read a book or magazine (don’t do this using a device….see below). If you’re worrying about something write your thoughts down before you go to bed, it will help you stop thinking about them
    • Avoid caffeine after 6.00pm 
    • Avoid ‘blue light’ devices for at least an hour before bedtime i.e. Mobile phones, laptops, tablets etc.
    • Remove phones and tablets from bedrooms at night

Diet

Nutrition, quite literally, powers us to perform. We may feel that we are working our hardest to achieve our goals, but if we are not fuelling our bodies in the best way then we aren’t going to perform at our best. 

You need good quality food, regularly. Make sure that you eat breakfast before you come to school, especially if you have an exam. Make sure you plan three meals a day into your revision timetable.

If you like to snack find some healthy snacks you can have when you’re revising, this could be fruit or nuts. Save the chocolate bar or crisps as a reward when you’ve done a chunk of revision or completed a particularly tricky topic.

What you drink is also important, make sure you drink lots of water and limit the amount of sugar and/or caffeine in your drinks. 

Being Active / Exercise

It is really important that you build time into each week to exercise and get be active. This might be going to the gym, playing a sport or simply a brisk walk. As well as being good for your body, it’s a good stress reliever. If you don’t naturally do something then maybe try and build a couple of slots into your revision timetable.

Spotting and Dealing With Stress

 

Mangotsfield School is committed to supporting all students who feel unable to cope at times.

You know yourself well and how you normally show stress. However some common signs to keep an eye out for are:

  • Feeling nervous or ‘on edge’ a lot of the time
  • Feeling tearful, upset or angry (even if you don’t know what is causing it)
  • Becoming socially withdrawn
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Changes in eating habits
  • Suffering panic attacks
  • Avoiding anything to do with the thing that is bothering you

If you are struggling please tell us. Normally talking to your mentor is a good starting place although class teachers are also able to offer some guidance, or you can always go to the Student Centre. 

There are also some online resources which can help. Useful websites include: 

https://www.studentminds.org.uk/examstress.html  

https://stem4.org.uk/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI4a2A48DK2AIVzJPtCh3YVAmWEAAYAiAAEgIPAPD_BwE 

https://youngminds.org.uk/find-help/feelings-and-symptoms/problems-at-school/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIsdiRr_TK2AIVrp3tCh2cRw4gEAAYBCAAEgIO8_D_BwE 

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/stress-anxiety-depression/coping-with-exam-stress/

English (Language and Literature)

Maths

Science (Trilogy & Triple)

French

German

Geography

History

Computer Science

Business and Enterprise

Drama

DT

Engineering

Food

iMedia

Music

PE

RS